Sarracenia rubra

  Carnivorous plant - Sarracenia rubra

Sarracenia rubra ranges widely in the southeastern United States, from North Carolina to Mississippi.  This picture shows you the kind of place Sarracenia rubra is likely to be found: flat low places with standing water--boggy places with pines here and there.

Carnivorous plant - Sarracenia rubra

Sarracenia rubra is easily recognized because it has slender reddish pitcher-leaves that don't flare at the top.  The lid of the pitcher is roughly circular in shape.  The sepals are large and green, and the petals can be dark red, as in this picture.

The pitcher lid of Sarracenia rubra is bright red on top, and the red veins on the inside form a pattern attractive to an insect.  The edge of the pitcher is like a narrow red lip.

If one flips the lid of a Sarracenia rubra pitcher up, one can see the pattern of red veins on a contrasting background.

This is a close-up of the juncture between the inside ofr the lid and the tube of the pitcher.  Notice that the white hairs are denser at the bottom of the lid.  These hairs are stiff and point downward, so that an insect that is crawling from the lid (where it probably is feeding on some nectar secretions) into the tube tends to go downwards. The hairs tend to prevent an insect from crawling upward.

Carnivorous plant - Sarracenia rubra

A number of hybrids between Sarracenia species occur.  This is a hybrid between Sarracenia rubra and S. leucophylla.  Notice that the lid flares upward (rather than arching hood-like over the opening of the pitcher, as in S. leucophylla, but the the background of the veins inside the lid is red, as is the outside of the pitcher, as in S. rubra.

Here's the inside of the lid of a hybrid between Sarracenia rubra and S. leucophylla.  It occurred in the wild.  However, a number of Sarracenia hybrids have been made, and those who grow Sarracenias like to collect them--horticulture is often a matter of finding something different or new.  Notice in this particular picture that the illumination reveals an abundance of downwardly-pointing hairs on the inner surface of the lid of the pitcher.

 
 
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