FROM: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Vista/9202/mac.html

John McIntosh came to Canada with the United Empire Loyalists. The Loyalists were a group of people forced to flee the United States in the 1770's because they remained loyal to Britain. McIntosh spent some time on the frontier, then settled in Dundas County, Ontario, Canada, in 1790. The town where he settled was later called McIntosh's Corners, and is now called Dundela.

While clearing some forest land in 1796, McIntosh discovered about 20 young apple trees. He transplanted the trees to a place near his home, but by 1830, only one tree was still alive. McIntosh combined his own name with the colour of the fruit, and called the tree the "McIntosh Red."

From the time the tree was first transplanted it produced an abundance of tasty apples. In 1893, the McIntosh house caught fire and the tree, located just 15 feet from the house, was badly burned along one side. However, the healthy side continued to produce apples until 1908.

Fortunately, as early as 1836, McIntosh's son Allen began grafting parts of the tree so that it could be grown in other places by other farmers.

Two monuments stand at Dundela, Ontario, Canada, commemorating McIntosh and his apple:
 
 

JOHN McINTOSH

1777 - 1846

McIntosh's parents emigrated from Inverness, Scotland to the Mohawk Valley, N.Y., and John moved to Upper Canada in 1796. In 1811 he acquired a farm near this site, and while clearing the land of second growth discovered several apple seedlings. He transplanted these, and one bore the superior fruit which became famous as the McIntosh Red apple. John's son Allan established a nursery and promoted this new species extensively. It was widely acclaimed in Ontario and the northern United States, and was introduced into British Columbia about 1910. Its popularity in North America and propagation in many lands attest the initiative and industry of John McIntosh and his descendants.
Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historical Site Board
THE ORIGINAL McINTOSH RED APPLE TREE

stood about 20 rods north of this spot. It was one
of a number of seedlings taken from the border
of the clearings and transplanted by John McIntosh
in the year 1796.

ERECTED BY POPULAR SUBSCRIPTION 1912


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