Some Frequently Asked Questions about a Career in Botany


1. Will I get a job?
Plant science is a growing field as more and more people recognize how vital plants are to many aspects of society - However, some areas are more competitive than others. For instance, in recent years the number of ecology graduates has outnumbered the job openings, but positions are open in agronomy and biotechnology. A degree in botany provides a solid scientific foundation to make you more employable in other fields as well, should you later decide not to be a botanist.

2. How much will I earn?
As in any field, salary depends on training and experience, as well as where you work. In general, salaries in scientific and technical fields are above average in a community. Salaries for botanists are competitive with other sciences. The outlook is best for those with advanced degrees and with working experience.

3. Where can I work?
Botanically related jobs are found in any community. Some are primarily indoors, others involve mostly outside work. They may be in cities, in the country, or in natural wilderness areas. Opportunities are available throughout the country and throughout the world. For many botanists, a career in botany is a passport to visit and study plants in exotic lands.

4. How should I prepare myself?
A college degree, preferably in botany, plant science or biology, is necessary for most careers in botany.

5. Where should I study?
For an undergraduate degree, most colleges and universities have a biology department with courses in botany. For graduate degrees, you should choose a school with strength in your particular interest area.


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